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By: Sipi Gupta | January 13, 2020

Long-term care insurance is a specific type of insurance product that helps people cover the cost of long-term care beyond a predetermined period.  But it’s not the only way to pay for in-home care, adult day care, assisted living or a nursing home.

 

Short-term care insurance is an alternative to long-term care insurance that provides good coverage for those in need of long-term care.  Not only are they less expensive, but they may also be available to older seniors or those who aren't otherwise eligible for long-term coverage. Short-term care insurance policies (also known as recovery care or convalescent care policies) will offer between $50 to $300 per day of long-term care coverage for 180 to 360 days.  You choose t...

By: Sipi Gupta | September 16, 2019

If you're enrolled in the Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) Program and get a bill for Medicare deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments, here are three things to do:

Tell the provider or debt collector that you have QMB and can’t be charged for Medicare deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Show your provider your Medicaid or QMB card every time you get medical services or items. If you already made payments on a bill for services and items Medicare covers, you have the right to a refund.

If the medical provider won’t stop billing you, call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227). TTY users can call 1-877-486-2048. The agent can confirm that you have QMB. Medicare can also ask the provider to stop improper billing, and refund any incorre...

By: Sipi Gupta | August 24, 2019

As your parents age, they may spend months or years in a nursing facility. What happens if one of them is in need of long-term care and is unable to pay for it?  Currently, 28 states and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico have filial responsibility laws holding adult children legally responsible for support of financially strapped parents.


Pennsylvania has captured the most attention, due to a case, HCRA v. Pittas (2012 Pa. Super 96, May 7, 2012), in which an adult son was found liable for his mother’s $93,000 nursing home bill following an automobile accident. 


Maryann Pittas, the victim of a car accident, was a patient in a nursing home for about six months. A few weeks after she was released, her son received the nurs...

By: Sipi Gupta | July 08, 2019

There are many federal government benefit programs available to individuals with disabilities. Programs are often referred to by confusing acronyms (LIHEAP, SNAP, QMB, to name just a few) and some programs are very different but sound similar (for instance, Medicare and Medicaid or SSI and SSDI). Stop in each week for a spotlight on a different benefit program. Today, we take a look at QDWI.

Qualified Disabled Working Individual

Benefit: Medicaid benefit; pays Medicare Part A premiums
Asset Limit: $4,000 single; $6,000 couple
Income Limit: 200% of FPG ($4,249 single; $5,722 couple)

By: Sipi Gupta | July 01, 2019

 

There are many federal government benefit programs available to individuals with disabilities. Programs are often referred to by confusing acronyms (LIHEAP, SNAP, QMB, to name just a few) and some programs are very different but sound similar (for instance, Medicare and Medicaid or SSI and SSDI). Stop in each week for a spotlight on a different benefit program. Today, we take a look at QI.

Qualified Individual (MSP)

Benefit:  Medicaid benefit; pays Medicare Part B premiums for people not otherwise eligible for Medicaid

Asset Limit: $7,730 single; $11,600 couple

Income Limit:  135% of FPG ($1,426 single; $1,923 couple)

By: Sipi Gupta | June 24, 2019

There are many federal government benefit programs available to individuals with disabilities. Programs are often referred to by confusing acronyms (LIHEAP, SNAP, QMB, to name just a few) and some programs are very different but sound similar (for instance, Medicare and Medicaid or SSI and SSDI). Stop in each week for a spotlight on a different benefit program. Today, we take a look at SLMB.

Specified Low-Income Medicare Beneficiary

Benefit:  Medicaid benefit; pays Medicare Part B premiums

Asset Limit: $7,730 single; $11,600 couple

Income Limit:  120% of FPG ($1,269 single; $1,711 couple)


By: Sipi Gupta | June 17, 2019

 

There are many federal government benefit programs available to individuals with disabilities. Programs are often referred to by confusing acronyms (LIHEAP, SNAP, QMB, to name just a few) and some programs are very different but sound similar (for instance, Medicare and Medicaid or SSI and SSDI). Stop in each week for a spotlight on a different benefit program. Today, we take a look at QMB.

Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (MSP)

Benefit:  Medicaid benefit; pays Medicare premiums, Medicare co-pays, and deductibles

Asset Limit: $7,730 single; $11,600 couple

Income Limit:  100% of FPG ($1,061 single; $1,430 couple)

By: Sipi Gupta | June 10, 2019

There are many federal government benefit programs available to individuals with disabilities. Programs are often referred to by confusing acronyms (LIHEAP, SNAP, QMB, to name just a few) and some programs are very different but sound similar (for instance, Medicare and Medicaid or SSI and SSDI). Stop in each week for a spotlight on a different benefit program. Today, we take a look at MSP.

Medicare Savings Program

Benefit:  Medicaid programs to help low-income Medicare beneficiaries (QMB, SLMB, etc.)

Asset Limit: Yes

Income Limit:  Yes

Comments: Must be receiving SSDI, CDB, or 65+.  SNT may preserve eligibility if excess assets as with other Medicaid programs

 

By: Sipi Gupta | May 27, 2019

There are many federal government benefit programs available to individuals with disabilities. Programs are often referred to by confusing acronyms (LIHEAP, SNAP, QMB, to name just a few) and some programs are very different but sound similar (for instance, Medicare and Medicaid or SSI and SSDI). Stop in each week for a spotlight on a different benefit program. Today, we take a look at Medicare.


Benefit:  Health insurance for recipients of social security retirement income and their spouse, SSDI, and CDB

Asset Limit:  None

Income Limit:  None

Comments: Medicare benefits do not start until 24 months after receipt of SSDI or CDB.  Retirees must be 65+

By: Sipi Gupta | April 08, 2019

There are many federal government benefit programs available to individuals with disabilities. Programs are often referred to by confusing acronyms (LIHEAP, SNAP, QMB, to name just a few) and some programs are very different but sound similar (for instance, Medicare and Medicaid or SSI and SSDI). Stop in each week for spotlights on different benefit programs. Today, we take a look at SSDI:

Social Security Disability Income

Benefit: Cash benefit for disabled person who paid into social security and under full retirement age

Asset Limit: None

Income Limit: None

Comments:  Must have required work credits based on age and, if over age 30, at least 20 credits must be earned within prior 10 years

By: Sipi Gupta | May 22, 2017

A special needs trust cannot pay for food or shelter for an SSI beneficiary without affecting his benefits. But there is no penalty for paying for someone’s food or shelter while they are on SSDI. And if the SSDI beneficiary receives Medicare, there is no penalty there, either.

By: Sipi Gupta | May 09, 2017

A Medicare Set-Aside is a trust or trust-like arrangement that is set up to hold settlement proceeds for future medical expenses. A specialized company evaluates your future medical needs, recommends an amount that should be set aside for future medical care, and the government approves the amount. The funds are then either placed in the Medicare Set-Aside account in one lump-sum or the account is funded with a "structured settlement annuity" that will refill the account over time. In either case, the administrator of the Medicare Set-Aside trust may use the funds only to pay for medical care related to your personal injury, leaving Medicare or your private insurance free to provide coverage for medical expenses that are not relat...